1. Incorporating Residential Histories into Space-Time Models for Health Geographic Analysis


 

This research project will develop and test new spatial statistical methods for health and disease mapping that incorporate residential history data. These statistical methods will enable researchers to assess risk of chronic diseases, such as cancer, and other health outcomes, such as pre-term births, as a function of the geographic-specific exposures associated with residential history. The new statistical methods will provide researchers with a robust and powerful tool for using residential histories when they test hypotheses about geographic exposures over time and space and their impacts on health and disease. The project will increase basic understanding of the amount of information bias introduced when residential histories are ignored.

Funding: National Science Foundation                                                      

Research Page

 

Project Team

Kevin Henry
Daniel Wiese (Doctoral Student)
Antoinette Stroup (Associate Professor, Rutgers University)
Slobadan Vucetic (Professor, Temple University)
Aniruddha Maiti (Doctoral Student)

2. Geographic and Socioeconomic Disparities in Colon Cancer Stage at Diagnosis and Survival:Revisiting Neighborhood Poverty Using Residential Histories


We are currently using residential histories data linked to colon cancer cases to better understand the temporal interactions between socioeconomic and neighborhood environmental factors that influence cancer development and outcomes, including cancer stage at diagnosis and patient survival.

Publications:

Wiese D*, Stroup AM, Maiti A*, Harris G, Lynch SM, Vucetic S, Henry KA. Socioeconomic Disparities in Colon Cancer Survival: Revisiting Neighborhood Poverty using Residential Histories. Epidemiology, Accepted March 2, 2020.

Funding: National Science Foundation

 

Project Team

Kevin Henry
Daniel Wiese (Doctoral Student)
Antoinette Stroup (Associate Professor, Rutgers University)
Slobadan Vucetic (Professor, Temple University)
Aniruddha Maiti (Doctoral Student)

3. Residential Mobility, ethnic enclaves and Colon Cancer Stage at Diagnosis and Survival


The goal of this project is to utilize a previously collected population-based dataset of colon cancer cases (N= 17,067) from New Jersey diagnosed from 2006-2014 that include residential histories to examine associations between a patient’s cancer stage at time of diagnosis, and neighborhood characteristics including poverty and racial/ethnic composition.  For each case we will utilize 10 years of residential histories prior to diagnosis and merge residential locations to U.S census data including poverty and racial/ethnic composition based on census tract.  

 

Project Team

Kevin Henry
Daniel Wiese (Doctoral Student)
Antoinette Stroup (Associate Professor, Rutgers University)

4. Geographic Factors and HPV Vaccination in the United States


Using data from the National Immunization Survey-Teen (NIS-T), an annual survey the CDC conducts to monitor vaccination uptake in the U.S., we are examining what are the key individual-level (e.g., income, education, age and race/ethnicity) and geographic factors (e.g., poverty, rural/urban residence and racial composition) associated with HPV vaccination uptake, and how the HPV vaccination has spread over space and through time.  Given the low rates of HPV vaccination in the U.S., knowledge gained about the individual-level and geographic factors associated with HPV vaccination uptake and HPV vaccination diffusion in the U.S.

Funding: NCI R03 (completed), American Cancer Society (completed), Temple University College of Liberal Arts (Completed)
 

Project Team

Kevin Henry
Deanna Kepka (Associate Professor, University of Utah) 
 

5. Geographic Access to Mammography and Diffusion of Digital Mammography in the United States 2002-2014


The first digital mammography system (i.e Full-field digital mammography) was approved for use by the FDA in 2000. Breast imaging centers in the United States began to adopt digital technology throughout the first decade of the 2000s, replacing a technique that used photographic film to capture breast x-ray images. Adoption was initially slow despite the considerable technical and efficiency advantages over film.  The aim of our current study is to estimate and map geographic access to mammography facilities, and digital mammography facilities nationwide from 2001-2014 based on drive times to facilities. We will also examine geographic access by race/ethnicity,  rural/urban residence, population density and  poverty.  See the Diffusion of Digital Mammography Web Map

 

 

Project Team

Kevin Henry
Daniel Wiese (Doctoral Student)
Emma P Baylor (Undergraduate Student)
 

6. Geographic Access to Mammography and Diffusion of Digital Mammography in the United States 2002-2014


American Heart Association/American Stroke Association
Optimal Use of Stroke Systems of Care-Responding to Changing Paradigms (OPUS REACH)
Derek Isenberg, MD, FAAEM

Until recently, the treatment of acute ischemic stroke caused by Large Vessel Occlusion (LVO) was limited to intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA). A series of publications in 2015 showed that mechanical thrombectomy (MT) provides better outcomes to patients with LVO strokes than IV tPA alone. However, MT is underutilized, largely due to inadequate mechanisms to identify and transport patients with likely LVO strokes to MT-capable centers. We propose to expand an existing registry of LVO stroke patients in Delaware and the Philadelphia area who have been treated with MT. We will include data from EMS dispatch to 90- day functional outcome. We hypothesize that patients transported directly to MT-capable hospitals will have better functional outcomes, than those transferred from non-MT capable hospitals. This project includes street network and GIS-based analysis to examine optimal routing of patients to hospitals.

 

 

Project Team

 
PI Derek Isenberg, MD, FAAEM, Temple University
William Tagliamonte
Kevin Henry
 
 
 

Collaborative Projects

 

1. Ethnicity and Nativity in Cancer – Latino & Asian Enclaves: The ENCLAVE study” 


The MAPS lab is currently collaborating with researchers (PIs Pruitt and Shariff-Marco)  at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and the University of California at San Francisco, on their NCI R01 grant.

In this study, we will determine the protective and/or harmful effects of Latino and Asian ethnic enclaves on outcomes across the cancer continuum for breast, colorectal, and cervical cancers, by addressing these methodologic issues. We will include data from five diverse, populous states to address heterogeneity across specific ethnic and nativity subgroups. By using a multidimensional measure of ethnic enclave, state-of-the-science imputation methods to create complete Latino ethnic ancestry/origin and nativity cancer registry data, and rich population-based geographic and cancer surveillance data, ours will be the first and largest study to date to investigate the role of ethnic enclave residence and nativity on cancer outcomes among nine Latino and Asian ethnic groups.

Funding: National Cancer Insitute (2020-2025)
 
 
 
 

2. The MAPS lab is currently collaborating with PI Dr Shannon  Lynch at Fox Chase Cancer Center on her American Cancer Society Mentored Research Scholars Grant.


We are providing geographical analysis support to identify geographic target areas for neighborhood–based prostate cancer screening interventions and clinical and behavioral interventions to improve prostate cancer survival in Pennsylvania.  Geographic areas with an excess burden prostate cancer incidence and late stage disease will be identified using two spatial statistical techniques, the spatial scan statistic and Bayesian geo-additive models. 

 
 

Project Team

Kevin Henry
Daniel Wiese (Doctoral Student)
Shannon Lynch (Assistant Professor, Fox Chase Cancer Center)
 

3. The MAPS lab is currently collaborating with PI Dr. Shannon Lynch at Fox Chase Cancer Center on her project entitled ‘Toward Precision Prevention in Liver Cancer’

 
 

Project Team

Kevin Henry
Daniel Wiese (Doctoral Student)
Shannon Lynch (Assistant Professor, Fox Chase Cancer Center)
 

Past Projects


 

1. Geographic Variation in Female Breast Cancer Survival in New Jersey


Wiese D*, Stroup AM, Lynch SM, Crosbie A, Henry KA. The impact of neighborhood economic and racial inequalities on the spatial variation of breast cancer survival in New Jersey. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, October 2019.

 

Project Team

Kevin Henry
Daniel Wiese (Doctoral Student)
Antoinette Stroup (Associate Professor, Rutgers University)
 

2. Tobacco retail licensing and density three years after license regulations in Philadelphia


Lawman HG, Henry KA, Scheeres A, Hillengas A, Coffman R, Strasser A. Tobacco retail licensing and density three years after license regulations in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. American Journal of Public Health. In press 12/3/2019

 
 

 

 

3. Screening for Congenital Heart Defects


Pinto NM, Henry KA, Grobman W, Ness A, Miller S, Ellestad S, Gotteiner N, Tacy T, Wei G, Minich L, Kinney AY.  Physician Barriers and Facilitators for Screening for Congenital Heart Defects on Routine Obstetric Ultrasound: A National U.S. Survey. Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine. Accepted 11/29/2019

 

Pinto N, Henry KA, Wei G, Sheng X, Greene T, Puchalski M, Byrne J, Kinney A.  Barriers to Sonographer Screening for Fetal Heart Defects: A National Survey’. Fetal Diagnosis and Therapy. 2019 Aug 15:1-10. doi: 10.1159/000501430. [Epub ahead of print]